Posts Tagged ‘landscape painting’

Good News

March 27, 2013

river_raptureRiver Rapture, pastel on panel, 16×20, © 2013 Marianne Post

I recently was notified that River Rapture was juried into the Northwest Pastel Society International Show. The exhibit will open in May at The Art Company in Tacoma, Washington. This is a scene from one of our favorite hiking spots in the Cascades below Paulina Falls, just south of Bend, Oregon.

 

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So Far

September 18, 2012

This past week I finally had a chance to revisit “starts” from  my five day Richard McKinley workshop in Bend. This was my first experience attending an Art in the Mountains event. Boy, does Tracy Culbertson, workshop coordinator, have the venue of all venues. The Cascades and downtown Bend are a mecca for inspiration. Coupled with a stellar instructor, and companionship of a fellow artist from California it was five days of instruction, beauty, discussion, and determination to go the next mile.

thumbnails of Sparks Lake

Thumbnails of major shapes, value map and notan design

As a plein air painter, the grandeur of the vista can be overwhelming. Having spent hours in the field, I would like to think I am comfortable in the wilds. But the reality is that I still try to depict the scene as I see it. Finally I was given permission to not only move a tree or a mountain but to capture the sencse of place without being wed to the what’s in front of me. In fact.I got to the point afer five days, to turn my easel away from the scene and paint from memory. What a liberating concept!

It all started with some thumbnails to define the shapes, value plan and composition. Then a quick field study, in this case a small 4×6 supplied me with color notes. Now back in the studio, I did a watercolor underpainting, referring to my field notes. After a day in the studio here is where I am so far. And it feels good!

Watercolor underpainting of Sparks LakeWatercolor underpainting

Work in Progress, Sparks LakeWork in progress, 16×20, pastel on panel

Does Painting Purple Mean I am Old

July 16, 2012

Height of Summer, 12 x 6
pastel on panel

This past week, California artist friend, Cheryl Crews, joined me to paint in the lavender fields of the Willamette Valley. We literally went from one end of the valley to the other in search of purple fields. On Wednesday we joined up with my local plein air group, Vista and Vineyards to paint at Moon Shadow Lavender farms in Albany, only to find our picture on the front page of the Albany Democrat Herald. Check out their Facebook page.

While Cherryl painted in oils and I in pastels our violet palette got a workout. One of my paintings from Mountainside Lavender Farms in Hillsboro garnered an honorable mention at the Yamhill Lavender Festival art show this past weekend.

Trying Something New for A Change.

May 18, 2012

Garlands Nursery

Garlands Nursery, pastel on LaCarte sanded paper

This past Wednesday was the first outing of the local plein air group. Traditionally the first venue we paint is Garlands, the local, quintessential nursery. It has everything any green or purple thumb could ever imagine. It also has many places to duck undercover in case the weather doesn’t cooperate.

Forecast: warm and sunny
But this week the weatherman predicted clear sky and mid 70s. I decided before packing to go that morning, that I would try using some orange La Carte sanded paper, a real departure from my usual Amperdand Pastelbord. My thinking was that the orange would work to my advantage in setting the stage for a sunny day painting, and also work as a complement to all the green I was bound to encounter. And I admit, “I’m trying something new.” could also be my excuse in the event of a really lousy painting.

Warm and cool
My approach was to depict the light of a sunny day, by starting with warm colors in the sunlit masses and cool colors in the shadows, regardless of the local color. I gradually brought the masses to their real color but always letting some of my first marks show through. I also left the edges loose so that the orange paper would unify the painting and add shimmer to the piece.

The end result was okay! I had a lot of fun getting this “to work.” I’d try it again, actually. But perhaps I should invest in a lot of blue La Carte to use on those Oregon gray days we so often encounter! Have you stepped out of your comfort zone lately and tried something different for a change?

Back on Track

May 9, 2012

Hug Point Pastel Painting

Hug Point, 12 x12, pastel on panel
$350.00, unframed
demonstration painting available thru Primary Elements Gallery

It’s been awhile. Almost a year to be exact since my last post. Being a firm believer that blog posts are worth their while something happened. I guess I became a blog agnostic over these past twelve months. And the ironic thing about my whole departure from the blog scene was I had tons to blog about. Finding a topic to make into a post that has some interest and possible even some meat can be a daunting task. So that wasn’t even my excuse. But enough about where I haven’t been and what I haven’t been doing.

SPRING UNVEILING
This past weekend I had the opportunity to participate in so many ways at the annual Spring Unveiling in Cannon Beach, OR. Between doing a workshop on Friday and demonstration painting in the gallery on Saturday, talking with past patrons, old friends, and other artists for three days was a real treat. Primary Element Gallery owner, Stephanie Ainsley, pulled out all the stops when it came to receptions on Friday and Saturday evenings. All the energy thoughout the village galleries was phenomenal and I suppose that was the kick in the pants and a whack on the side of the head I needed to get online and onboard with my languishing blog.

So I hope you stay tuned and follow some of the exciting news I have to share with you over the weeks and months to come.

Springing into Action

May 2, 2011

This past weekend I was invited to demo at Primary Elements Gallery in Cannon Beach. The town was bustling with visitors to Spring Unveiling, a weekend long event that kicked off Friday evening. I found myself painting, talking, talking and painting to an array of collectors, and fellow artists of all ages. The painting I did was of a place I have painted many times before. But as onlookers could see, the serendipity aspect of using watercolor underpaintings opens up a world of possibilities to respond with my sticks of pastel.

Day Glow, 9 x 12, psstel, ©Marianne Post

Saturday morning I found myself back in front of my easel and painted another quick piece. This time I used a couple of photos to create a composition, Coastal Wildlife.

Coastal Wildlife, 9 x12 pastel, Marianne Post

From Sketch to the Studio

January 19, 2011

In keeping with my daily sketch challenge I ventured out (the sun was shining) and found a grove of trees that danced amongst the sunlight and shadows. So I settled in and spent about 30 minutes capturing the play of light and shadow. I haven’t posted a “work in progress” (wip) painting in awhile so I thought this would be the perfect opportunity to show how I approach a painting.

This is the 30 minute on location sketch.


Back in my studio I did a drawing on 12 x 16″ mounted Wallis sanded paper. I usually don’t do such a detailed sketch but I just got caught up in the moment and went with the flow. Since I had so much graphite on the surface I sprayed it with Perlafix fixative. I also hoped with the use of the fixative that some of the drawing would survive the next step, the watercolor underpainting.

Watercolor underpainting.

And after about fours hours into the painting with soft pastels this is where I left off. Obviously still lots to resolve but I like the direction this is going.


Look Familiar, I Don’t Think So!

February 25, 2010

Red Poppies, soft pastel on panel
© 2009 Marianne Post

You often hear artist’s say that they enjoy the creativity of making the ordinary extraordinary. I like to describe my artistic journey as making the familiar, unfamiliar. That is, painting everyday things with a twist; opening the eyes of those who view my painting so they see things in a new way. Lately I have been revisiting former subjects seeing them with fresh eyes myself. Red Poppies is similar to a painting I sold about three years ago. And while it is a familiar subject, this time around instead of focusing on the nuances of their colors I really enjoyed capturing the way they dance in the breeze. A carefree feeling of airiness and dance is what I am after here. Hope you feel it too!

Storm Runoff

February 15, 2010

Storm Runoff, 9 x 12″ soft pastel on Wallis paper
2010 Marianne Post

Completed in the studio over a watercolor underpainting. I couldn’t decide whether to leave the telephone poles in or out, Decided on keeping them since I liked how the shadow of the nearest pole acted as another path for the eye to follow.

Less than Sixty Minutes

February 4, 2010

Snow Road, 9 x 12: ©2009 Marianne Post

I mentioned last week that painting time was at a premium these days. This morning I was able to eke out forty-five minutes and decided to go for it. So here is quick snow study. Didn’t quite finish it up but it was just refreshing to spend the time painting. Easel time works wonders for dissolving the stresses of the day.